Wednesday, March 5, 2008

Manners and Etiquette: What's appropriate in your country?

Listen to this recording and share your ideas on the topic.

9 comments:

  1. I'm Japanese and of course I know that making noise when you eat noodles is not rude at all here. When you eat hot noodles, how do you cool them down if you don't make noise? It's very strange and interesting for me that people keep themselves quiet when they eat noodles.
    Anyway, we have many manners to be taught. For exaple, we use chopticks and you shouldn't pass food from them to another. You shouldn't pull over a plate by them. When you have soup(miso-soup), you can't use a spoon instead of chopsticks. You should hold the bowl and put your lips on it when you drink the soup.
    I'd like to know the different manners from foreign countries.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It's pretty normal in America that people will greet eachother by hugging them, or some girls will even kiss others' cheeks; but in Taiwan, our culture is kind of formal, if you just go and hug someone, they might feel uncomfortable, because that's "too close" to them. Not because we are grave people, it's just because that's our culture. It's not right, it's not wrong, it's just different :) !!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm Japanese and, you know, Japanese are said to be very serious and hardworking. Once we get into the other cultures, we have a lof of trouble getting familiar with them. In that sense Japanese take a long time to do.
    As the porverb says, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do."
    all we have to do is imitate what foreigners do in their country and
    venture into different situations and have them understand us better.

    ReplyDelete
  4. When you're invited to have lunch or dinner in a friend's house in Brazil, it's ok to eat twice. In other words, it's quite common for someone to ask for another plate of whatever they're eating, and it's considered to be a good sign. It shows the host that you really liked the food.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm from Russia,Moscow.My experience shows that we usually tend not to speak loudly while being outside and it kind of shock us when we hear people talking and laughing loudly and as a rule they turn out to be foreigners :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm Japanese and, you know, Japanese are said to be very serious and hardworking. Once we get into the other cultures, we have a lof of trouble getting familiar with them. In that sense Japanese take a long time to do.
    As the porverb says, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do."
    all we have to do is imitate what foreigners do in their country and
    venture into different situations and have them understand us better.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi i'm from India in India we have meany different cultures, about the food there is meany different kiend of food I'm from southeast so our special dish is Baryani we use our hands we dont use chopticks, fork, or spoon we dont use all of this stuff. The manners you have to be very nice to everyone and be polite.

    ReplyDelete
  8. hi,i'm from china. There are many cultures about eating in China.For example, when you are invited for dinner, people treats guests with the utmost cordiality, they often tell you to eat more and drink more,it shows the sincerity of friends, but in other countries it may be impolite, because they have no such habit. Guests are quite to eat and not disturbed during the dinner.

    ReplyDelete
  9. hi,i'm from china. There are many cultures about eating in China.For example, when you are invited for dinner, people treats guests with the utmost cordiality, they often tell you to eat more and drink more,it shows the sincerity of friends, but in other countries it may be impolite, because they have no such habit. Guests are quite to eat and not disturbed during the dinner.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for posting a comment. I appreciate your interesting in sharing your ideas.

Best,

Randall